Fire Inspections

All commercial occupancies within the city of Nash are subject to inspection by the fire department. Inspections are initiated routinely every year, as well as in response to an application for certain permits or a citizen complaint.

The department can also conduct fire and life safety surveys in residences. These surveys are completely optional and are only performed when requested.

For more information on fire inspections, contact our office at (903) 832 7071.

Fire Reports

Every time the fire department responds to an emergency incident, firefighters must complete a written account of the event. The owner of the property where a fire has occurred will usually need to obtain a copy of this report prior to filing an insurance claim.

Copies of fire reports can be made available to the property owner or insurance agent upon request. However, it's usually best to wait at least 48 hours to allow us time to process the report and ensure there are no errors or missing information.

EMS reports are considered confidential and will only be released with a court order or authorization from the patient. In most cases, patient information is kept on file with the EMS or healthcare provider.

Outdoor Burning

The following guidelines have been developed to assist in proper outdoor burning in compliance with local ordinances.

  • Burning is only allowed in calm wind conditions and in the absence of a county-issued burning ban.
  • All burning must be conducted in daylight hours only.
  • Burning must take place in an approved incinerator. The incinerator that has been approved by the fire chief is a 55-gallon steel barrel with a screen-wire top. The screen material is not to exceed ½" mesh.
  • The incinerator must be positioned away from structures, trees, and other properties and in such a manner as to prevent smoke or odor from becoming a nuisance to surrounding buildings and occupants.
  • Only brush, limbs, leaves, grass, lumber, etc. may be burned. (No furniture, household trash, or plastics)
  • All burning must be constantly monitored with a means of control such as a garden hose in place.
  • No burning will be permitted in or on a street, alley, ditch, or public property.

Burning on the ground within city limits is not allowed without a burning permit. Permits are issued on a case-by-case basis, and burning must still comply with state regulations. For information on obtaining a burning permit, contact city hall or the fire department.

Authorization to conduct outdoor burning does not exempt or excuse any person from being held responsible for any damages or injuries resulting from the burning. Also, if smoke or odor from your fire poses a health hazard to a neighbor, you may be required to extinguish the fire.

These guidelines are based on sections 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 of ordinance #05-05A of the Code of Ordinances for the city of Nash, Texas.

Smoke Detectors

Smoke alarms save lives, but only if they are properly installed and functioning. Most fire fatalities happen in homes without working smoke alarms.

The fire department recommends you install at least one smoke alarm on every level of your home. Bedrooms are the best places to put alarms, since they are designed to wake you up if a fire starts while you are sleeping.

Smoke detectors should be tested regularly to make sure they are working. If your alarm is battery-operated, the batteries should be replaced at least once a year. The best way to remember is to change your batteries when you change your clock for daylight savings time.

Some smoke alarms are equipped with a lithium battery that is meant to last up to ten years. These batteries are not replaceable, so the detector itself should be replaced if the alarm begins to "chirp" or fails to respond to periodic testing.

In the event of a false alarm, use the "hush" button on the detector. Never disconnect or remove the battery. If the alarm does not have a silence button, use a magazine or towel to wave fresh air into the unit.

Remember to replace your smoke alarms every ten years. After ten years, your smoke detector will have been operating for over 87,000 hours. No other appliance in your home works for this long. If you are not sure how old your smoke alarm is, it's best to err on the side of caution and replace it.

Smoke detectors can be purchased from most hardware, home supply, or general merchandise stores. If you are renting a house or apartment, your landlord should provide you with a working smoke alarm. A limited quantity of free smoke detectors are also available at city hall for senior and disabled residents that have limited financial resources.